Robotic Assisted Spinal Surgery | FAQ’s

Robotic Assisted Spinal Surgery | FAQ’s


(electronic music)>>So robotic-assisted surgery in medicine is really an evolving art. So there have been robots now that help us take gall bladders out, help surgeons take prostates out. Now in spine surgery we have
the ability to use a robot where we can actually plan a surgery, plan where want screws
to go, plan where we want to do a decompression,
and with the aid of robot, have that trajectory and
have that plan affected with sub-millimeter accuracy. So the robot is going
to help elevate the art of what we do in surgery. (electronic music) I think almost anybody
that needs screws placed in the spine is a potential
candidate for robotic surgery. There are some cases where
the robot may not make sense and in some cervical cases or in some routine degenerative cases, but certainly in most
cases and especially those where anatomy is complex, the adjunct of the robot will
help us improve our outcomes, help us do what we do on a daily basis with a higher degree of accuracy, hopefully collapsing the time of surgery, which also improves outcomes. (electronic music) Everything in medicine is an
evolution and along the way what we are trying to do is improve upon what we have been doing for
the past 20 or 30 years. So image guidance, for
instance, gave us the ability to see in real time where
we were in the spine. The addition of robotics now elevates that to the next level, so
while we are accurate now, we can automate that accuracy,
we can take the accuracy that we’ve gotten with
image guidance surgery and parlay that into automation where we can plan multiple trajectories and then, with robot assistance, have those trajectories
affected one after the other after the other in a
fairly predictable fashion. (electronic music) Having good outcomes following surgery, essentially are related
to multiple factors and those factors begin
with the first meeting of the patient, taking
a very thorough history, looking at all the imaging,
talking with the patient, and deciding upon whether
or not, first of all, is surgery indicated at all and then, when we decide upon surgery,
tailoring that surgery for the particular patient,
picking an operation to ensure a good outcome. And every step of the way
managing expectations, explaining to the patient
what they’re going to be going through, what
pain is like after surgery, and then ultimately, how do
we get to the end of the road, the end of the yellow brick
road, that rehabilitation state where patients can get back to life, get back to doing things
that they were unable to do prior to surgery. (electronic music)>>Sure, the rehabilitation
really is everything and in most cases and
in almost every case, it begins with walking. I tell all my patients
ultimately that the goal after any spinal surgery
is to walk one hour a day. The power and benefits of walking an hour a day are innumerous. In addition to that, we talk about, potentially, physical
therapy, core strengthening, conditioning, and then ultimately, the rehabilitation depends on
what the patient wants to do. So if the patient is
a golfer for instance, we have certain physical therapy for those who want to return to golf. We tailor the entire rehabilitative
aspect of spinal surgery to trying to get that
patient back to doing things that they want to do. In some cases, need to
do, like drive, walk, etc. (electronic music)


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