My Mom Uses Her Illness To Keep Dad Away From His Lover. Bad Plan

My Mom Uses Her Illness To Keep Dad Away From His Lover. Bad Plan


Hi! My name is Lee-Ann, I’m 14, and I’m lying
to my dad about my mom to help her save our family. This story, or rather a whole bunch of unpleasant
occasions, happened a while ago. I was living together with my mom and dad
and my little brother Mathew – he’s two. And just like in any other family, my parents
sometimes argued over things. They eventually always made peace after a
little while and things would go back to normal again, which always made me pretty sure that
that was the normal, and how marriage should be. But one day it turned out that I was terribly
mistaken when I heard my mommy crying in the bathroom. It was in the middle of the day and I was
doing my homework and mom was busy with her chores. At some point, she asked me to look after
Mathew while she was going to put a load in the washing machine. After 10 minutes I realized that mom still
hadn’t returned, so I called to her, but she didn’t answer and I decided to go and
see if everything was okay with her. I found my mom crying over the laundry basket. She said that she had stubbed her toe badly
and that’s why she had tears running down her face, but I felt like something else was
going on that made her so upset. Just for you to understand – my mom’s a
very tough woman and most of the time she keeps her emotions to herself, no matter whether
these emotions are positive or negative. She never cries over, let’s say, a sad film
or upsetting news. And you can be sure she wouldn’t just sit
there and cry over a stubbed toe. Oh, by the way, I guess it’s because of this
that I was never really close with my mom. She always said that I had plenty of peers
around me to be friends with, and she was eager to be a respected grownup and that’s
it. This pattern of my mom’s character is key
to this story so keep listening Anyway, later that day, or rather during the
night I woke up because I heard some voices. It was my parents talking loudly to each other,
and judging from the few words that reached me, I figured out that my mom had found a
lipstick mark on my dad’s shirt while she was doing laundry. Then I understood why she was crying earlier
that day – she decided that dad was cheating on her with another woman. I got really scared. Recently the parents of one of my classmates
divorced and I saw how hard it was for him to be forced through such serious changes
in his life, and I really didn’t want my family to break up. So, I was just lying in my bed trying not
to move or to breathe loud enough that I wouldn’t be able to hear anything else from that talk. Then I heard a rumbling sound and a minute
later dad entered my room. It turned out that while they were arguing,
mom fainted. She immediately regained consciousness, but
dad decided to take her to the hospital just to make sure that she was all right. He needed me to be awake now to look after
Mathew. I will never forget that night. I darted from one corner to another while
I was waiting for my parents to return. They didn’t come home until the morning. Dad was gloomy, and mom’s face showed that
she had only just stopped crying. They said that we needed to talk. It turned out that back there in the hospital
while doctors were doing all the necessary tests to figure out whether mom got hurt when
she fainted or not, they found something that shouldn’t be there. This is how all of us figured out that my
mom had lymphoma. Of course, everybody was shocked and devastated. And you can rest assured that mom decided
to start her treatment immediately. Dad told me that ever since then I would have
to cover mom’s back with the housework, at least to some extent, but he really didn’t
need to say anything – I was ready to do anything to help mom. So every day, when I came from school, I had
to cook, clean, wash, and vacuum. And, of course, I tried to look after Mathew
on my own, ‘cause, you know, after the chemo mom didn’t really feel well and she could
barely take care of herself. Mom’s health condition wasn’t the only thing
that was different now, but also her temper. Day by day she became totally unbearable. Anytime she heard me at home, she had something
to ask me to do, like, to fix her pillows or put socks on her feet – you know, the
stuff she could really do herself. And it was not only me who she was torturing
with her illness. She constantly yelled at my dad, saying that
he did everything wrong – he didn’t cook soup for her in the way that she told him
to do it, and he didn’t buy anything at the store that she asked for, and he did a
crappy job of looking after me and Mathew and so on. According to mom, dad actually did virtually
everything wrong. And she also kept whining all the time about
her health. Yes, I know, my mom – the tough woman, but
she was whining to everyone who ever called her to ask her how she was doing. It’s not that I’m complaining now. Believe me, I’m perfectly aware of what
a torture it was for my mom to have cancer. It’s just, I was only 14, you know, and
I was supposed to have fun with my friends like any other 14-year-old, but I got housework
and babysitting instead. And she never even said “thank you” for
all I was doing for her and just took it all for granted. And I couldn’t say a word to mom, because
she was sick and I didn’t want to make her upset. Dad, on the other hand, was the only person
who could completely understand me being tired from mom. We sometimes didn’t even need to talk to
each other; we could, for example, clean the kitchen together, not saying word to each
other, but I would have a feeling that I was not alone in my suffering, you know. All I wanted to say was that during that period
of time, when mom was ill, my dad and I got really close to each other. That is probably why the thing I’ll be talking
about a little later turned out to be so hard for me to do. One day I had stayed up late doing my homework
and decided to drink warm milk before going to bed, but as I was approaching the kitchen
I heard my dad talking on his cell phone. I didn’t mean to eavesdrop, but he was whispering
something in the phone, it was as if he wanted to hide whatever he was saying from everybody
else, so I couldn’t help but tune into it. Dad noticed me almost at once and dropped
the phone, like he was completely surprised. His suspicious behavior could’ve only meant
one thing to me – that he was having an affair and was talking to this other woman
when I caught him. Honestly, I didn’t know what to say. I just stood there in the kitchen doorway
trying to look at my dad as contemptuously as I could. How could he do this to his sick wife? Of course, he began telling me some stupid
things, that this was a business call, and he dropped it just because it was already
over and he just didn’t expect to see me and so on. But obviously he should’ve come up with
a better excuse, ‘cause I looked at the clock on the wall, which indicated that it
was already nearly midnight, which was too late for work calls and dad understood that
I didn’t believe him. Then dad sighed and said that we needed to
talk. It was one of the most serious talks I’ve
ever had in my life. It turned out that there really was another
woman whose name was Jessica and who could make my dad happy — he was pretty sure of
that, and that night when the doctors found mom’s cancer he was just about to tell mom
that he was going to leave her. But then she got sick and he simply couldn’t
do it, while Jessica kept insisting on him finally making a decision. He said he wasn’t expecting for me to understand
him or anything; he just wanted me to not tell my mom about all this, at least until
she gets well. “I didn’t know what to do. I mean, of course, I promised him that I would
keep his secret for the family’s sake, but later, when I was already in bed, I kept thinking
over that situation. At first, I imagined, that mom beat her lymphoma
and became healthy again. But then dad told her about his mistress and
left us, and mom became devastated and desperate – no more “happy family” for any of
us. But what if mom never made it and passed away? This still didn’t look like a happy family. Besides, in that case, how long would it take
for dad to bring the new mom home? Oh, God, I wished I had never found out about
all these grown-up games! ”
The next morning my dad was supposed to take my mom to the doctor, but he had a work call
so I insisted on accompanying her instead. Before he left for work, he gave me a meaningful
look, you know, which was supposed to remind me of what I’d promised him earlier. I’d thought so hard about all these family
values, deceits, and other things, that I didn’t even notice how my mom and I even
arrived at the doctor’s office. As soon as we entered and saw the doctor’s
face, we knew that he had some great news. Mom was so lucky to have kicked cancer’s butt. Of course, everybody was extremely happy. And we hugged the doctor, and thanked him,
like, a million times, but then mom grabbed her cell phone, intending to call my dad and
I knew this was my last chance, so I stopped her and said that we needed to talk. Not a single muscle flinched on mom’s face. She seemed to be aware of everything already,
and now her suspicions had simply been confirmed. She patted me on the head. I was ready to cry over how worthless I felt
at that moment – it was like I ruined the best news in the world about mom’s recovery. But then I suddenly noticed a change in mom’s
face. She looked mysterious and deep in thought. Mom suddenly said that we’d better keep our
little bit of good news from dad for a while, at least until she comes up with a better
plan to make him stay with the family. Was it shocking? Hell yeah! And totally unexpected. I don’t know any other woman who’d be
as inventive as my mom. It’s been two weeks now that she has continued
pretending to be sick and I’ve continued to assist her in it and dad still knows nothing
and keeps taking care of her. And recently, mom suggested that I seize the
moment and give dad a hint that his wife’s illness could probably be God’s punishment
for his cheating. I don’t know how long that plan will last
and what my dad’s reaction will be if the truth is revealed, but I do know that I’ve
never felt like I was that close with my mom before. Now, wish us good luck in the comments section
and click the subscribe button in order to not miss the sequel to this story.


100 thoughts on “My Mom Uses Her Illness To Keep Dad Away From His Lover. Bad Plan

  1. If I have freaking cancer and my 14 year old kids complain about helping around the house, they’ll be kicked out of the house by their dad 🤷🏻‍♀️

    But the dad in the story is a jerk. He’s still in contact with the other woman while his wife has cancer? He doesn’t behave like an adult at all, he behaves like a teenager! Adults are not supposed to be running around chasing new love when they already made such huge commitment.

  2. Is no one going to talk about how he drank blood?! He STOLE HER CELL PHONE………

    HOW DOES THIS GUY STILL HAVE A JOB

  3. That doctor is a creep, or maybe he just like the mother, first he drinked her blood for diagnosis and then stealing her phone. Hahahaha

  4. YOU BAD PERSON YOU NEED TO TELL HIM HE OS UNHAPPY HE DOES NOT DESERVE YOU PEOPLE MAKE HIM SAD SO GIVE HIM HIS RIGHTS YOUR ALL HAPPY BUT HIM

  5. The doctor just casually drink her blood…

    And the doctor that stole my mom's phone!

    Seriously these doctors need to go to the doctor.

  6. Dad leaving you. No happy family. Listen I've seen people who lost both parents and got send to a miserable Foster family. Atleast you will have 1 family member left. If she died can't he just take you 2 with him. I know how sad it is for you but not really for me since I've seen this cruel world in black and white and in full color.

  7. How can an idiot like her miss that the doctor STOLE her phone. That isn't the big question . The big question is that how she managed without her phone .

  8. Who else saw the doctor drinking the blood then n the background he just casually takes the phone like this comment if you did

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